They will give USD 2,000 to relatives of victims of accident in Mexico’s metro

They will give USD 2,000 to relatives of victims of accident in Mexico’s metro

The mayoralty of Mexico City will provide immediate aid of about $ 2,000 to the relatives of the 26 people who died in the subway accident last Monday, the Official Gazette of the capital reported this Saturday.

For the approximately 80 people who were injured in the worst accident in the capital subway, founded in 1969, the aid amounts to about $ 500.

These amounts were authorized “as measures of immediate assistance in the concepts of food, transportation, accommodation and the procurement and administration of justice,” says the Official Gazette.

The compensation, displayed in Units of Measure, is equivalent to 10,037 pesos (about $ 500) for those injured in the accident, and 20,060 pesos (about $ 2,000 for the relatives of the deceased.

The Executive Commission for Attention to Victims of Mexico City was in charge of determining the origin and amounts of the aid.

The agreement published in the Gazette does not detail whether this will be a definitive compensation.

Several of the deceased were heads of families, many of them workers or service employees, according to the accounts of their loved ones.

On Friday, hundreds of people demonstrated shouting “justice!”, Pointing to officials as responsible for the tragedy, during a protest in the area of ​​the accident, in the municipality of Tláhuac, one of the most marginalized in the capital.

Chancellor Marcelo Ebrard, from the ruling Morena party, has been harshly criticized because as mayor of the city (from 2006 to 2012) he ordered the construction of this metro line, the most expensive and which cost 70% more than estimated.

The current mayor, Claudia Sheinbaum, also from Morena, is also criticized for alleged failures in maintenance.

Miguel Ángel Mancera, once an ally of Ebrard and now a senator for the leftist PRD, was mayor from 2012 to 2018 and is singled out for having allowed this metro line to operate despite having initially suspended a section due to failures.

Mancera is also questioned about the maintenance work after the September 2017 earthquakes that shook Mexico.

Melissa Galbraith
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