Bariloche: A young man died of Hantavirus and they asked to increase Prevention Measures

Bariloche: A young man died of Hantavirus and they asked to increase Prevention Measures

A young man from Bariloche died of hantavirus and the Río Negro Health Ministry called for increased precautions. They claim that the variant that circulates in Patagonia It is transmitted from person to person and that the reactivation of different activities and greater citizen circulation could generate more infected.

The death was confirmed by the authorities of the Ramón Carrillo Hospital of the city and the results of the studies sent to the ANLIS – Malbrán (National Administration of Laboratories and Health Institutes) in Buenos Aires indicated that the death that occurred on Friday in the Patagonian health center was due to the virus transmitted by the long-tailed mouse.

The symptoms that the youth of 23 years had presented consisted of body pain, vomiting and diarrhea, as detailed by his relatives to local media.

In this context, the coordinator of the Regional Epidemiological and Environmental Health Unit (URESA) in the Andean area of ​​Río Negro, Eduardo Herrero, emphasized precautionary measures and that hantavirus “is endemic.” In turn, he assured that “there are not a large number of cases.”

Herrero insisted that “the rodent is there and the probability of contagion is there”, and to avoid contracting the virus, he stressed the importance of use of bleach and frequent hand washing.

He also underlined the relevance of light and ventilation, move around enabled trails and campsites, use potable water and do not leave garbage exposed to transmitting animals.

According to statements reproduced by TelamHe pointed out that in the mountains “it is advisable to carry a dropper with bleach and put one drop per liter, in addition to bringing a soap.” “Do not deviate unnecessarily from the bites and if firewood is collected, do it during the day, since it reduces the risk due to ultraviolet light from the Sun,” he stressed.

To conclude, he warned: “We can assess that people were more at home due to the coronavirus, they were less exposed and there were fewer cases. Today it is moving and perhaps they could increase the risk of contagion ”.

The long-tailed mouse is the main reservoir and transmitter rodent, shedding the virus through saliva, feces and urine (Shutterstock)

The long-tailed mouse is the main reservoir and transmitter rodent, shedding the virus through saliva, feces and urine. 

The long-tailed mouse is the main reservoir and transmitter rodent, eliminating the virus through saliva, feces and urine. The contagion to humans is by inhalation of the virus, by direct contact with rodents and their droppings, but the variant that circulates in Patagonia can be transmitted from person to person.

The main characteristic of these animals is that they have a very long tail, hence their name. They mainly inhabit four regions: in the north they can be found in Salta and Jujuy; in the center, in Buenos Aires, Santa Fe and Entre Ríos; in the northeast in Missions; and in the south, in Neuquén, Río Negro and Chubut.

Regarding the symptoms, they resemble those of a flu-like state. They can include: fever, muscle aches, chills, headaches, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. In general they do not have a runny nose or a cold.

After a few days, difficulty in breathing may appear, which can be aggravated by producing what is known as “Hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome”. It is a serious condition in which the person begins with heart failure and very low blood pressure. If it is not treated in time, it can lead to complications and even death. They should be assisted in hospital establishments, preferably with intensive care units that have mechanical ventilation.

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