Vera Putina, the centenarian who claims Putin’s motherhood

Vera Putina, the Centenarian Who Claims Putin’s Motherhood

It is not easy to reach this woman with a face so cracked that it is difficult to think that she could have been less old in another time. Be wary if the onlooker is Russian, but if the person who approaches is Western, the suspicion comes from above. Vera Nikolaevna Putina was born in 1926 and assures that she is the biological mother of Vladimir Putin. In his defeated cheekbones it is difficult to appreciate similarity. Perhaps in her eyes, a grayish blue that should call for calm. She is very short, but it does not prevent her from sustaining the story. If the story she tells is true, the first war the Russian president waged may have been intrauterine. In 2006, the journalist Irina Bobrova reconstructed the chronicle in the Russian newspaper Moskovski Komsomolets. Vera Putina was born in the Russian district of Ochyorsky, in the Perm Krai region. She graduated from the local secondary school and entered the Agricultural Mechanization faculty, where she met Platon Privalov, a mediocre, hard-drinking trolley man. Once pregnant, she learned that she was married and that she intended to steal the baby for his barren wife.

Putin would have been born in 1950 and at the age of nine he was sent to the Urals with his maternal grandparents following the whim of Vera’s second husband, a soldier who despised and mistreated his stepson, beating him with a stick and forcing him to spend nights outdoors. His grandfather, a harsh Bolshevik, left him in an orphanage and from there she went to a married couple.. Vera did not know more about him. In 1999, seeing the image of her on television, she had a second thought. “It was Vova. A mother’s heart never fails », she confessed to reporters. She was struck by her identical walk, “like a duck,” as she described it. The old woman currently lives in Metekhi, an extremely poor suburb of Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia. When Putin became president, she bought a small television that she placed in front of the old sofa. She felt happy, even though she had just buried her husband. “Life is so. A black stripe replaces a white stripe,” she said. The Kremlin calls this version crazy. Russian journalist Artyom Borovik died in a freak plane crash when he tried to reach her for a documentary. Italian reporter Antonio Russo was also assassinated on October 16, 2000 while covering the Second Chechen War. According to what was later published, he planned to interview Vera Putina. Her body, tortured and bruised, was found in a ditch.

Also Vera has been pressured to remain silent, but there are testimonies that validate the story, such as a record of her schooling at the Metekhi school in 1959. His partner, Gabriel Datashvili, remembers him as a reserved child. Nora Gogolashvili, the teacher, points out that he was a taciturn student who was made fun of. He always wore patched pants.

Journalist Kristina Kurchab-Redlich, author of Vova, Volodva, Vladimir. Secrets of Putin’s Russia visited her in 2019 and found her very bent and old. In her book, she adds the scientific theories that speak of maternal attachment as the most important human feeling. “If it is lost, everything you build from then on will be lost,” Putin grew up with the absence of his father and his mother’s anger at his status as a bastard. There are vengeful character could sprout. Vera keeps a photograph under her pillow that she tore out of a book. Tragedy has eaten at her every night since the Chechen wars. When asked if she would meet him, she replies with a resounding no.

Melissa Galbraith
Melissa Galbraith is the World News reporter for Globe Live Media. She covers all the major events happening around the World. From Europe to Americas, from Asia to Antarctica, Melissa covers it all. Never miss another Major World Event by bookmarking her author page right here.