They propose sending nude images into space in an attempt to contact aliens: “The message is simple but significant”

They propose sending nude images into space in an attempt to contact aliens: “The message is simple but significant”

  • A conspiracy theorist denounces having seen a UFO in the Sun and NASA gives the corresponding explanation.

The project called Beacon in the Galaxy (BITG), developed by researchers from different disciplines, including physicists and astrophysicists from NASA , has proposed in its attempt to contact extraterrestrial life to send images of two naked human silhouettes into space , the of a man and that of a woman, who with their hands raised in greeting.

This has been proposed in a preliminary scientific article -not yet peer-reviewed- published in the Arxiv repository by a team led by Dr. Jonathan Jiang from NASA’s  Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California (USA), which is the leading center for NASA for robotic exploration of the solar system.

The team has developed an updated binary encoded message for transmission to extraterrestrial intelligences in the Milky Way galaxy.

The proposed message includes basic mathematical and physical concepts to establish a universal means of communication followed by information on the biochemical composition of life on Earth, the position of the Solar System in the Milky Way, as well as digitized representations of the Solar System and the surface from the earth.

The idea of ​​communication would conclude with digitized images of two silhouettes of the human body, one of a man and the other of a woman, together with an invitation to respond to any possible type of receiving intelligence.

If this communication were to take place, in reality, it would not be the first. The Beacon in the Galaxy project  is an update of signals previously sent to space based on the 1974 Arecibo message issued from the observatory of the same name in Puerto Rico . Since then, a host of messages have been sent into space, including an ad for the snack brand Doritos .

Also the 2021 Lucy Mission , which included a poem by young poet laureate Amanda Gorman, lyrics by the Beatles, and a fossil belonging to the ancient human ancestor that gave the mission its name.

According to CNN, the current BITG proposal wants to focus on sending concepts that could be more understandable for extraterrestrial intelligence, such as mathematics or physics . Therefore, the message would include a time stamp, a location mark, visual representations of the double helix structure of DNA and a hydrogen atom, as well as explanations of mathematical operations, an illustration of the solar system, and a map of the earth.

The message would conclude with a digitized illustration of the silhouettes of a naked male body and another naked female body, both with their forearms raised and their hands open in an attempt to convey a ‘hello’.

“This information is part of the basics that is expected from any message to an extraterrestrial intelligence (ETI), since it allows the recognition of our appearance, a detail of us in which a certain ETI would be interested, relevant in case it is set up more exchanges, or if we ever meet physically,” the scientists told CNN. ” The message is simple but significant “, with the ultimate goal of “starting a dialogue with ETI, no matter how far in the future it may occur”, they added.

The researchers propose using the FAST Observable Field , the world’s largest radio telescope, located in Pingtang, Guizhouu, China , to carry out this communication attempt .

Bruce Dorminey
I'm a science journalist and host of Cosmic Controversy (brucedorminey.podbean.com) as well as author of "Distant Wanderers: the Search for Planets Beyond the Solar System."  I primarily cover aerospace and astronomy. I’m a former Hong Kong bureau chief for Aviation Week & Space Technology magazine and former Paris-based technology correspondent for the Financial Times newspaper who has reported from six continents. A 1998 winner in the Royal Aeronautical Society's Aerospace Journalist of the Year Awards (AJOYA), I’ve interviewed Nobel Prize winners and written about everything from potato blight to dark energy. Previously, I was a film and arts correspondent in New York and Europe, primarily for newspaper outlets like the International Herald Tribune, the Boston Globe and Canada's Globe & Mail. Recently, I've contributed to Scientific American.com, Nature News, Physics World, and Yale Environment 360.com. I'm a current contributor to Astronomy and Sky & Telescope and a correspondent for Renewable Energy World. Twitter @bdorminey