SpaceX launched 60 more satellites for its Starlink internet network

SpaceX launched 60 more satellites for its Starlink internet network

The company SpaceX launched this Wednesday from Cape Canaveral, in central Florida, its fourth Falcon 9 rocket of the month to carry a new fleet of 60 Starlink broadband satellites to space.

At 2:59 p.m. EDT (6:59 p.m. GMT) the rocket lifted off from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station.

SpaceX thus completes 28 operational satellite launches and in addition to 100 consecutive successful launchings of a Falcon 9 rocket, since in June 2015 the second stage failed during takeoff, as detailed.

Today, about nine minutes after departure, the first stage of the rocket, the reusable part, completed its return to successfully land on a floating platform in the Atlantic called “Just Read the Instructions.”

This operation allows SpaceX to reuse the most expensive parts of the rocket, which in turn reduces the cost of access to space.

The idea of ​​Elon Musk’s company is to place some 1,600 Starlink program satellites in Earth orbit, some 549 kilometers above Earth, a much shorter distance than usual for these commercial devices.

The Starlink program now offers an initial beta service both domestically and internationally and will continue to expand to near-global coverage of the populated world in 2021, explains the SpaceX website.

With the massive shipment of satellites from the Starlink network, SpaceX intends to provide high-speed, constant and “affordable” internet to users anywhere in the world through these satellites that will operate in a low orbit, which will allow a better connection and service.

In addition to the satellites to provide broadband internet, the rocket was attached to a Capella Synthetic Aperture (SAR) radar satellite and another Tyvak-0130, SpaceX said via Twitter.

According to the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOOA), the launch previously carried out by the company in recent weeks was “an optical spectrum astronomical observation nano-satellite.”

Since 2010 there have been at least 116 launches of this rocket considered a “workhorse” by the company of Elon Musk, also owner of Tesla electric cars, and NASA partner in the program to send astronauts to the International Space Station in commercial ships from US soil.

On May 4, the aerospace company launched another batch of 60 satellites into space from Florida for its Starlink internet network.

The Starlink program now offers an initial beta service both domestically and internationally and will continue to expand to near-global coverage of the populated world in 2021, explains the SpaceX website.

With the massive shipment of satellites from the Starlink network, SpaceX intends to provide high-speed, constant and “affordable” internet to users anywhere in the world through these satellites that will operate in a low orbit, which will allow a better connection and service.

Ben Oakley
Ben Oakley is the guy you can really trust when it comes to Mainstream News. Whether it is something happening at the Wall Street of New York City or inside the White House in Washington, D.C., no one can cover mainstream news like Ben. Get a daily dose of Trustworthy News by Ben Oakley, only at Globe Live Media.