New York to analyze social accounts of gun license applicants

New York to analyze social accounts of gun license applicants

New York is tightening its procedure for carrying a concealed firearm. Applicants will be required to provide their social media accounts for analysis.

Starting September 1, New York State residents who want to be able to wear a firearm covert will have to submit their social media accounts for analysis. These will need to provide details of their active and inactive accounts for the last three years, with at least four references.

New York strengthens its procedures for carrying a concealed firearm

These accounts will be used to analyze the “character and behavior” of the claimant, according to the Associated Press. Those who want to obtain the license will have to show that they have “the character, temperament and judgment necessary to be able to carry a weapon and use it without endangering themselves or others.” Local authorities, judges and county clerks will be responsible for looking for any warning signs on these accounts.

This measure was included in a bill that Governor Kathy Hochul signed into law last week. The goal was to put in place new gun restrictions following a Supreme Court ruling that most people have the right to carry a handgun for their own protection.

Applicants will be required to provide their social media accounts for analysis

Kathy Hochul acknowledged that shooters often share details or hints of their plan online. The person accused of killing 19 children and 2 teachers in Uvalde, Texas last May harassed and threatened to harm girls and young women on social media. Suspects of other mass shootings had posted manifestos online before going on the attack.

Opponents do not look favorably on this provision of accounts on social networks. No one knows, for example, how the state will handle issues of privacy and freedom of expression, or how it will deal with the intent of permit applicants on social media posts.

Peter Kehoe, executive director of the New York Sheriffs’ Association, said the law violates the Second Amendment and suggested that local authorities should not review claimants’ accounts: “I don’t think that we should do this,” he told Globe Live Media. “I think that would be a constitutional invasion of privacy.” Others have expressed concerns about this law in relation to the surveillance of people of color.

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