The 10 things you should know if you are pregnant and work in the US

The 10 things you should know if you are pregnant and work in the US

There are federal laws, such as the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA) that protect you from being discriminated against in your workplace if you are pregnant in the US. At Globe Live Media we explain everything you need to know about this law and all the things you should know if you are pregnant

If you are pregnant and work in the United States, there are federal laws that protect you from being discriminated against or harassed in your workplace. Similarly, there are federal regulations that indicate that you have the right to request adjustments related to your functions as an employee that allow you to continue with your work without putting your health at risk.

At Globe Live Media we tell you the 10 things you should know if you are pregnant and work in the US, according to the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

1- Can I be fired if I am pregnant while working in the US?

Under the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA), female employees in the US cannot be discriminated against because of:

1) Being pregnant.
2) Have been pregnant.
3) The possibility of becoming pregnant or the intention of having a child.
4) Have a medical condition related to pregnancy.
5) Have an abortion or consider having an abortion.

So this means you can’t be fired, turned down for a job or job promotion, have fewer assignments, or be forced to take leave for any of these reasons.

2) Can my employer fire me if he thinks my pregnancy could put me at risk?
According to the EEOC, your employer cannot remove you from your job or your work space because he believes that this poses a risk to you or your pregnancy. However, if he believes that you cannot perform your duties or that you may put other workers at risk, he may offer you to take on other functions.

3- What should I do if I am being harassed because of my pregnancy or a medical condition related to my pregnancy?
Under the PDA and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), harassment due to pregnancy or pregnancy-related medical conditions is not allowed.

Therefore, you have the right to express to your employer about any type of harassment, so that he takes action on the matter. If you do, your employer must, as required by law, implement actions to prevent this from happening again in the future.

4- What should I do if I have difficulties to carry out my work due to my pregnancy?
In that case, you may be able to get your employer to implement measures that allow you to carry out your work safely. This includes (but is not limited to) altering work hours, permission to sit or stand, acquiring ergonomic furniture, changing shifts, removing fringe functions from your job, and even allowing you to work from home. House.

You don’t have to have a particular measurement in mind when requesting it from your employer, although you can ask for something specific. However, you should know that federal law does not require your employer to spend too much money to implement these measures.

5- What should I do if I cannot carry out my work regularly if I am pregnant, even if my employer implements measures for my comfort?
Under the PDA, you may be able to change job duties in the event you are unable to perform your current duties if you are pregnant. Depending on how your employer treats non-pregnant employees with similar limitations, PDA could require your boss to reduce your workload or even take away essential functions of your job.

It could also assign you, temporarily, to a different job position.

6- What should I do if my health insurance tells me that I cannot work due to my pregnancy?
You’ll want to make sure you really can’t do your job because of your pregnancy, and find out if your health insurance provider has considered having your employer implement measures to help you do your job. .

Typically, workload reductions and temporary reassignment at your job can be accompanied by a pay cut. However, the EEOC states that your employer cannot reduce your wages just because you need an accommodation to do your regular job.

7- What should I do if I cannot work at all due to my pregnancy?

In the event that you are unable to work at all due to your pregnancy, you may be entitled to unpaid work leave as a support measure.

Also, the US Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) can help you obtain leave without it meaning that you will be fired.

8- What should I do if I need an accommodation measure, less workload or a permit due to my pregnancy?
First, you should explain the situation to your supervisor, your Human Resources manager, or someone else who needs to know that you need to change your workload, and let them know that you need an accommodation or leave due to your pregnancy.

In general, it is advisable to request any accommodation measure before your work performance is affected due to your pregnancy, since your employers can fire you because you are not meeting your work standards.

9- Can my employer fire me if I ask for an accommodation measure or if I need one?
The answer is no. According to the EEOC, your employer cannot legally fire you (or refuse to hire or promote you) because you requested an accommodation because of your pregnancy.

Similarly, your employer cannot charge you for the costs of an accommodation measure.

10- What should I do if I think my rights as a pregnant woman have been violated?
The EEOC will help you decide what is best for you to do, and this may include filing a charge of discrimination, which you must do within 180 days of the violation of your rights.

Similarly, you should know that it is illegal for your employer to retaliate against you for contacting the EEOC or filing a charge of discrimination.

For more information, visit the EEOC website or call 800-669-4000.