Social Security Disability Insurance: What is it and how can you register?

Social Security Disability Insurance: What is it and how can you register?

One way people with compromised physical or mental conditions earn income is through Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), and those who qualify can receive between $800 and $1,800 a month.

In 2021, the average monthly Social Security payment for the disabled was $1,277.

What is SSDI?

SSDI is intended to provide relief to people with disabilities who are no longer able to work, or in the same capacity as before.

The benefit is intended to replace a portion of the skilled worker’s salary. The amount you receive will depend on the age at which you became disabled and your employment history, including the average amount of earnings you have earned. To view your earnings history, you can view your statement online through your Social Security account.

Also, how much SSDI you receive depends on how many credits you have earned during your work history.

According to the Social Security Administration (SSA), workers received a credit for every $1,470 earned, but keep in mind that the earnings threshold increases slightly each year. It is important not to confuse SSDI with Supplemental Security Income (SSI).

While people with disabilities can claim both benefits at the same time, SSI is intended to help blind and disabled people who have little or no income, as well as people age 65 and older.

How to register?

There are two ways to see if you are eligible for both SSDI and SSI. You can apply at SSA’s separate online portals for SSDI and SSI, and you can also call SSA Monday through Friday between 7 am and 7 pm at 1-800-772-1213. But keep in mind that the average wait time for an application to be approved is usually between three and five months.

How could I lose SSDI?

Please note that there are a couple of ways you can lose profits. If you start earning at least $1,040 or $1,740 for the blind, you could lose benefits. Another way you could lose benefits is if your health improves to the point that you are no longer considered disabled.

Melissa Galbraith
Melissa Galbraith is the World News reporter for Globe Live Media. She covers all the major events happening around the World. From Europe to Americas, from Asia to Antarctica, Melissa covers it all. Never miss another Major World Event by bookmarking her author page right here.