WHO shows Concern about resurgence of Ebola in West Africa

WHO shows Concern about resurgence of Ebola in West Africa

The World Health Organization (WHO) expressed its concern this Sunday about the probable resurgence of Ebola in Guinea-Conakry, the country where the outbreak that unleashed in Africa originated at the end of 2013 Occidental the worst epidemic of that disease in history, with at least 11,300 deaths.

“Very concerned by reports of 4 suspected Ebola deaths in Guinea. WHO is accelerating preparedness and response efforts for the potential resurgence of Ebola in West Africa, a region that suffered greatly from Ebola in 2014,” it said today WHO Regional Director for Africa, Matshidiso Moeti, via Twitter.
Hours earlier, overnight, the director general of the WHO, Tedro Adhanom Ghebreyesus, had confirmed that the UN agency was aware of the possible cases in Guinea and that the final confirmation tests were underway.
The reaction of the UN authorities came after this Saturday the Government of Guinea-Conakry made public that the first analyzes with samples of suspected cases detected in the southeast of the country had tested positive for Ebola.
The Guinean authorities speak, for the moment, of up to four suspicious deaths and another five cases under treatment, but they are waiting for a second reconfirmation test that is currently being carried out in Conakry to confirm the resurgence of the virus.
“There were some first tests that were carried out in the European Union laboratory in Guéckédou. Those tests have confirmed that it is the Ebola virus disease. We are going to do a second test in Conakry to confirm or deny the results,” he said. on Saturday the Guinean Minister of Health, Rémy Lamah, according to local media.
According to information provided by the Guinean National Health Security Agency (ANSS), it is known that a nurse fell ill with Ebola symptoms at the end of January and died in the Gouécké area, near the city of N’Zérékoré. (southeast).
Subsequently, eight people who attended his funeral (on February 1) also presented symptoms – diarrhea, vomiting and bleeding – and three of them also died.
Ebola had not been detected in Guinea-Conakry since the end of the great epidemic that struck West Africa between 2014 and 2016 and whose first cases had emerged precisely in this country at the end of 2013.
It was the worst in history with 11,300 deaths and more than 28,500 infected people, although these figures, according to the WHO, could be conservative.
The Ebola virus is transmitted through direct contact with blood and contaminated body fluids of people or animals, causes hemorrhagic fever and can reach a mortality rate of 90% if it is not treated in time.
This is not the only potential Ebola outbreak that worries Africa, since, in parallel, in recent days three cases were also reported in the northeast of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), in the center of the continent, a country who suffers the scourge of this virus relatively frequently. 

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